Nubble update

I ran into my mom this morning thanks to a trip to the supermarket. Turns out she’d just sent me an e-mail. This message read:

It turns out that Nubble has a couple weeks. She is taking meds that make her feel ok. She is tired because she is anemic, but she is not in pain. However, it will be in the next few weeks. Once she starts limping, or acting as if she’s in any pain at all, it will be the time.

In the meantime, she gets to eat like a pig and get all the loving she wants.

Nubble has been the luckiest dog ever to walk the Earth, so I will be taking comfort in what we’ve done for her, as well as what she’s done for me.

I get to visit with her tomorrow. The fact is, I can’t run her or even walk her anymore, and she’ll be dead within two weeks, barring a miracle. When I see her, she’ll be wagging her tail and probably doing the pseudo-crying thing she does upon greeting a few select people, which used to make me think she was kind of a ‘tard when in fact she is brilliant for a dog.

I fucking hate this.

nubble_and_mom

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  1. #1 by Crudely Wrott on November 12, 2009 - 12:16 am

    Doggone dogs. They take your heart and then they grow old and die right there in front of you. Life is not fair. Ahhh, but . . .

    I was just today in the presence of two old dogs who I had never met before. I was at a customer’s house for the first time. (Home Improvement is my name; a later day tinker.)

    Both are well beyond their normal life spans, mostly sessile and yet they were both delighted to meet me. Both got to their feet to say hello but not right away; each in their own time. Their behavior, in fact their good manners, certainly owes much to their human, Julie. Julie is a most perceptive person and no doubt is fluent in the doggish tongues. A handy talent since dogs are not fluent in peoplish language though they are spot on with tone of voice and body language.

    As someone who has counted dogs not only as companions and friends but working partners (herding large ungulates), I can only say that humans and dogs have benefited from a long partnership. It would seem that each would owe the other a debt of gratitude. I observe that dogs take that obligation to heart and I think that we should return the favor.

    Love to the end and remember longer. It’s healthy for you. And for dogs.

    Doggone dogs.

  2. #2 by Norm on November 12, 2009 - 1:48 am

    What a happy face. She is so sweet.
    Here’s to Nubble, the luckiest dog to ever walk the Earth!

  3. #3 by Barbara on November 12, 2009 - 10:38 am

    So sorry to hear about Nubble. When my first Golden died, I cried for two weeks it just ripped my heart out. May she enjoy her final days.

  4. #4 by kemibe on November 12, 2009 - 10:57 am

    She is apparently doing well, drinking water, going outside to pee, drinking water…et cetera. I’ll see her later today and will take a bunch of pics. I’m sure the dope she’s on is a big boost. And she is reportedly still using her nose as a weapon in that uniquely Golden way. (She has a habit of flipping my laptop over when I am using it at my parents’ and she wants some attention.)

    You guys are great. Basically this is is a blog consisting of wretched outcries about the failings of humanity, something I have more or less single-handedly managed to bring about. And we’ve therefore attracted like-minded commenters. But when more sensitive and personal stuff arises, your collective basic humanism (if I may include dog-related matters in this) comes out.

    Crudely Wrott, your words here, as with others in the past, give the lie to your handle. In all seriousness that was incredible.

  5. #5 by Warren on November 12, 2009 - 6:31 pm

    Oh, that is hard. Best to you and your family.

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