Nubble’s formal medical diagnosis

I’m going to override my copy-editing instincts and reproduce this exactly as it was written.


11/10/09
Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital, Portsmouth, NH
Pateint: Nubble Beck

Final Diagnosis

Splenic Mass – Suspect Histiocytic Disease

Skin Issues – Suspect Histiocytic Disease

Joint Effusion – Suspect related to the histiocytic disease.

Anemia – Suspect related to the histiocytic disease.

Hyphema (Blood in the eye) – Suspect related to the histiocytic disease.

Nubble was brought into the emergency service at Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital Saturday the 7th for futher work up and care for her fever, painful abdomen, and acting lethargic. On presentation was quiet and dull and did have a fever of 103.9. She had blood in her right eye. Her abdomen was tense and she was found to have mildly swollen joints consistent with joint effusion. We submitted full blood work including a tick panel and urinalysis and performed xrays of her chest. She was started on supportive care that day/night while awaiting the lab results. Her chest X-rays were clear but her abdominal ultrasound revealed masses on her spleen and liver. Further examination revealed multiple small nodules under her skin.

Her blood work returned to show she is anemic. Her tick panel was negative. Aspirates of her spleen and liver that were sent to the lab revealed evidence of cancer called Histiocytic Sarcoma in her spleen. With all of her other symptoms, we are very suspicious that she has a disseminated form of the disease. We would have to perform further diagnostic tests to completely confirm this is cancer but the description of her splenic cells is very convincing of the disease. Unfortunately these forms of disease do not have a very good prognosis even with chemotherapy. We have printed off some information regarding the histiocytic diseases for you to review and there is a very good overview on the UC Davis web site (www.ucdavis.com). [Ed. NOTE: That link is for shit. A direct link, the material behind which I will get to, is at http://www.histiocytosis.ucdavis.edu.%5D

Please watch her carefully for any worsening lethargy, decreased appetite, worsening lameness or reluctance to move, increased breathing effort, or any other unusual behavior. PLease call Dover Veterinary Hospital or Port City Veterinary Referring Hospital if you have any questions or concerns.


Nubble is on Tramodol (a narcotic painkiller used in dogs and sometimes cats), cyclosporine (an immunosuppresant), prednisone (a steroidal anti-inflammatory), and prednisolone eye-drops, as her right eye was still red straight through the iris as I saw it yesterday.

For now, it’s wait and see.

Think, think, think…

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  1. #1 by Suesquatch on November 13, 2009 - 6:17 pm

    Tramodol is used on humans, too. Synthetic opioid.

    {{Nubbles’ humans and Nubble}}

  2. #2 by Medical diagnosis on December 9, 2009 - 9:07 am

    The Analyst: Comprehensive Naturopathic Online Evaluations for those Seeking Doctors of Natural, Alternative and Holistic Medicine. No Naturopath in your Area? Travel-Free Naturopathy, Now.

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