There is no reality on which to superimpose this awful one

My late-childhood and teenage years, a time when I was in theory developing some awareness of a greater world than my own, coincided with the presidency of Ronald Reagan. Critics rightly argue that his administration began the gradual extinction of a meaningful middle class that continues today, and that he welcomed the onset of the religious perversion of the Republican Party, and that he did his best across two terms to pretend AIDS did not exist. But for present purposes, the pertinent fact is that, although he was adored by his party (and respected by most Democrats) and well-protected by various weasels in the intelligence and military communities, none of that would have resulted in his anything besides immediate removal from office by aghast officials before a mortified populace well before the tear-gassing of nonviolent protesters for the sake of insulting an Episcopal Church under the advisement of the U.S. Attorney General. And that ignores three straight years of obstructing justice and other absurdities that Adults In The Room were supposedly going to quash from the outset.

This is absolute madness, and mostly sadness for me and the people around me out of direct harm’s reach, and now falls entirely on a complicit Republican U.S. Congress. All of them are committed weasels now. The current Republican U.S. Senator from Colorado, Cory Gardner, is not a jerk by nature and didn’t begin as one in 2014. He was bipartisan on immigration and other issues. Then he decided his only strategy for re-election in a state rapidly trending blue was to go all-in on Donald Trump, and immediately began saying and doing things that he clearly didn’t want to, because they were embarrassing. But he did them and still does. And in fact, he was probably right about his strategy choice. But because he chose tha route, he now has an indelible stain on him and he is only in his middle forties.

And therein lies the problem. Once people become U.S. senators. their only real motivation is getting re-elected — Democrats and Republicans both. Everyone knows this, and everyone knows it is because these people are not merely bribed or bought by special interest, they are owned by them from the start. This is not a conspiratorial or even contentious idea; even if you were ignorant of politics generally and only knew that certain individuals had tens of billions of dollars more than even the wealthiest member of U.S. Congress, you would immediately recognize who really makes the laws and paus lawmakers their real salaries. It is a literally inevitable consequence of our system. Bernie Sanders is rich as hell, too.

So when you watch Mitch McConnell say that he doesn’t really see a problem, remember that Mitch McConnell started his political career with squat and is now worth $34 million, and Kentucky’s people have only suffered for it. People will publicly debase themselves for money, be it in reality shows where the worst result is a stupid person eating bugs or in the federal government where the result is barely contained violence set against the backdrop of a devastatingly mismanaged viral illness.

George Will, who for at least 120 years has been an arch-conservative (and a lovely wordsmith) wrote this yesterday:

“The measures necessary for restoration of national equilibrium are many and will be protracted far beyond [Donald Trump’s] removal. One such measure must be the removal of those in Congress who, unlike the sycophantic mediocrities who cosset him in the White House, will not disappear “magically,” as Eric Trump said the coronavirus would. Voters must dispatch his congressional enablers, especially the senators who still gambol around his ankles with a canine hunger for petting.

“In life’s unforgiving arithmetic, we are the sum of our choices. Congressional Republicans have made theirs for more than 1,200 days. We cannot know all the measures necessary to restore the nation’s domestic health and international standing, but we know the first step: Senate Republicans must be routed.”

And writing in Slate, Ben Mathis-Lilley underscores the fact that people like Gardner are not prisoners by any means but are actively corrupt, as a failure to get re-elected hardly spells doom for someone in his role:

“The U.S. has a mechanism by which it can remove a president, and all that mechanism currently requires is for 15 or so Republican senators to accept the possibility of losing a primary election sometime between five months and six years from now, a loss that would compel them, at worst, to accept lucrative corporate board of directors jobs and speaking engagements at Mastercard sales conferences. The pressure on these senators should be as intense as possible; for the rest of the government to allow the president to remain in office in this situation would be an admission that it, too, has failed.”

I hope that the next administration deals appropriately with the grip Evangelical Christianity holds on government and the fact that the driver of this concocted brand of Christianity is and always has been white nationalism and across-the-board bigotry. In the past, they weren’t fooling anyone who glanced under the hood of their newfangled form of “faith,” but in recent years and evermore today, they have stopped hiding it.

“Quit freaking out, it is the flu”: Steve McConkey’s divine self-embarrassment, Part 1

Part of my own unpleasantness involves focusing on especially bad representatives of the species, so that I can more readily write off the entire human circus as some ghoulish combination of greed, stupidity, dishonesty and rude smells.  But I was also brought up, without my own full awareness, to expect lying to be punished and liars to be shunned.  Especially in the context of boasting — which, even when arguably warranted, was independently frowned upon by a strong 50 percent of my parents. (This is probably why I perceive, say, my fastest running performances, best examples of writing and highest test scores as within a delta of ordinary, data be damned.) And any sort of underhanded behavior, especially the deliberate tricking of others — this might be cutting a running course or promising something you knew you couldn’t deliver — went into the same “proceed at your gravest risk” bin.

How I drew these values from my taciturn-but-particular Midwestern dad while viewing him chiefly as a grimly benevolent statue is a story for another day, as is my obvious failure to implement these values at every turn. But the wingnut flavors of American religion satisfy all of these flaws — lies, boasting and deceit — and that in part probably explains why I have chosen to direct most of my available venom at religious frauds. Or anyone with a personal beef who resorts to lying.

Steve McConkey is a bad person in every demonstrable way that can be determined at a distance. But despite his lack of virtuous accomplishments, he should not be denied at least the recognition of having successfully dedicated himself to bungling his own life beyond all likely frontiers of personal failure, right down to blaming everyone but himself for why he’s only content when he’s trying to play the bully.

When he’s not trying to see gay and transgender people “eliminated” (he really does use that word, and frequently) with lies and hectoring, he’s dribbling racist rumors and other babble on Facebook or at other wingnuts, or complaining that atheists by definition are evil and should be treated accordingly (and that every religion besides the version of Christianity he invented is illegitimate), or mocking overweight people, or trying to defame and doxx his detractors into silence using tactics more evocative of a 9-year-old aspirant to the Alt-Right than of even the most watered-down Jesus acolyte. I’m saving details on that last stuff for later.

But nowhere is the flameout of the last vestiges of Steve McConkey’s presumptive decency more evident than in his eagerness to spread damaging misinformation and predictions about the COVID-19 pandemic. Lots of vocal Evangelicals — who as a ponderous 80-million-strong jelly-headed bloc represent the slowly rotting collective albatross around the neck of American society — have taken the bait and dutifully relayed everything from Fox News to their Facebook pages. But none I know of have done it under the aegis of an epidemiology and biostatistics expert who continually trumpets his intelligence and his mostly false credentials while plainly not knowing a damned thing about anything.

It started on Feb. 28 with this.

This is an example of McConkey’s content appropriation — he copies the majority of an article from a media outlet or hoax-news site and puts it on 4 Winds, then links “his” 4 Winds article to Facebook, essentially presenting it as his own work. This is both typical of McConkey and low, but for present purposes it resulted in an unusually bad decision even for a someone whose unwise choices over a period of decades define the shitty existence he ekes out today.

Continue reading ““Quit freaking out, it is the flu”: Steve McConkey’s divine self-embarrassment, Part 1″

More bullshit A.A. hardliners preach: the veiled false dilemma

The Big Book of A.A. is cleverly written. Its author was very smart and persuasive as well as a shitbag. He was a Born Again Christian, meaning that, even sober, he was not living in reality whether he intended to or not.

The BAC flavor of Christopathy, then and today, is one one of those sects that tolerates nothing other than absolute obeisance to a openly narcissistic cock-slapper of a god, yet couches the whole relationship as mostly collegial rather than strictly abusive. By way of comparison, most Evangelical Christians, while ignorant by definition, are neurotypical, and are merely victims of childhood indoctrination with bad ideas. BACs maintain the basic extremist beliefs of standard ECs, but are virtually always mentally challenged. I don’t think this was nearly as true in Bill W’s day as it is now, but the simple fact is that he felt only those who’s had the kind of “saw God” experience he claimed to have had soon after sobering up (when his central nervous system was frantically bombarding him with the nasty phantasmagoria borne of chronic thiamine deficiency) stood a chance of “making it” in the long term.

This all dovetails into the lie that hardliners today buy into and propagate, 50 or so years after Bill W’s death, useful idiots that they are: The insistence that because people have stayed sober doing everything the Big Book “suggests” with great precision, this is not only the optimal route to sobriety but the only viable one. Continue reading “More bullshit A.A. hardliners preach: the veiled false dilemma”

The “higher power” problem in A.A. is an intentional design flaw

One theme that invariably emerges when I regularly attend AA meetings — something that happens only when I get bored or lonely enough, which between mid-December and mid-January tends to be more often —  is people with at least a couple of years of sobriety describing themselves as doing generally well in life, maybe even better than they expected at the start of the boozeless journey, but unable to settle on a higher power and feeling like they’re failing as a result. All signs are there that quitting drinking and being active about sobriety have been a smashing success for them, but the nature of “the program” compels them to fret needlessly about this “missing” element.

Even to those unaware of the history of the Big Book’s authorship, it should be clear that the chapter to the agnostic is a bald-faced bait-and-switch. It doesn’t really offer a path to working the steps for the godless, but rather unpretentiously cajoles the nonbeliever in the direction of faith. This is because the chapter was only included because a prominent businessman who happened to also be a prominent atheist (rare in those days) insisted on it; the Big Book was essentially Bill W’s sole creation.

The A.A. mantra that a higher power can be “anything you want” was clearly not a part of the worldview of Bill W, himself a full-force Born Again Christian. This is even more evident in the steps themselves; the scheme depends not just on any old “HP,” but one that is capable of not only moral judgment but moral enslavement. The “program” through Bill W’s lens is at least as much about atonement to a critical deity and adherence to its unknowable whims as it is about living well. Any higher power that could function within this scheme would have to possess all of the essential characteristics of the Abrahamic rage-god, even if we’re allowed to nominally declare it something else.

Nothing Bill W wrote suggests he believed that anything other than a “burning bush” moment could produce a lasting spiritual transformation, even if he appears to offer latitude in this area. This is cynical in the extreme and sets people up to fail, because some people have “spiritual experiences” they see as tantamount to a cure, and the next thing you know, they’re living in a van down by the river subsisting on government cheese and MD 20/20 in its whole grotesque range of flavors.

Some people simply aren’t constructed to approach sobriety with the metaphysical demands Bill W’s “suggestions” make on would-be step-completers. In my case I simply gave up and realized that I had managed half-consciously to set up my life over a period of years in such a way that I would basically have a hard time sustaining a return to drinking for more than a couple of hours without someone knowing about it. That’s as close as I can get to the level of absolute accountability the steps seem to demand.

If you are among the people who has been actively or passively convinced you’re cheating somehow by not having a reliable concept of a higher power, maybe just giving up on that part and taking recourse in Tradition Three is sufficient. Also, where I attend meetings, most people are receptive to such viewpoints; when I lived in the Bible Belt, not so much, and you may not have ready access to meetings where you won’t be silently or openly accused of excessive freelancing.

Christians: Why should anyone believe ideas you plainly reject yourself?

There are many compelling reasons to reject the idea that the Christian god is real. Most of these center, properly, on the lack of evidence for God and the undeniable and ever-growing body of evidence against innumerable biblical claims, while others encompass the inconsistencies and myriad logical contradictions within the Bible itself. More circumstantially, it’s impossible to not notice that some of the most ardent believers in the God of the Bible are either under the lash of mental illness, not very intelligent or both; the correlation between slack-jawed inbred yokelism and religiosity in the United States is practically unity. (This makes a certain sense, since the God of the Bible is a psychotically childish dipshit.) And it is undeniably true that no Christian who really believes that Christianity is about moral goodness could possibly support Donald Trump, and in fact should be calling for his death by stoning or whatever means is most convenient. Yet Christians are Trump’s most energetic supporters. They are a shitstain on American society and the world in general, and if all of them were swept up in a tsunami and dashed to pieces screaming against a rocky cliff, the rest of us would be vastly better off.

Often ignored in everyday evaluations of Christian nonsense, however, is the fact that the most ardent supporters of God, Evangelicals, clearly don’t believe in the God of the Bible themselves. Even if they did, it would be incumbent upon reasonable people to either ignore, deride or actively fight their incessant lunacy, depending on the circumstances. I won’t go so far as to say the world would be better off without belief in things that are demonstrably untrue, because, standing alone, fictional narratives (e.g., literature, films) can offer people a great deal of comfort in an uncaring universe. But the would be far better off without religion, and aggressive religious leaders of any faith should be met with proportional derision and their efforts opposed absolutely.

Continue reading “Christians: Why should anyone believe ideas you plainly reject yourself?”

Five in eight Americans can now identify thermonuclear-scale bullshit as bullshit

Pro-reason Americans can, I suppose, take solace in the 38% figure being the lowest in the 36-year-history of this poll from May 2017.

I take a perhaps more cynical view: Three in eight adult Americans subscribe to an obvious fairy tale (this poll isn’t about belief in god but in the Christian creation myth specifically). Another three in ten believe that “God” somehow “guided” this process, an idea that, while unsupported, is not flat-out stupid like creationism.

This wouldn’t be so bad if creationists didn’t try to push this nonsense into public schools with the unrelenting ferocity of starving termites, but if there’s one thing Evangelicals as a rule can do notoriously well, it’s behave very aggressively as if they don’t have anything resembling fully developed human brains inside their skulls. Continue reading “Five in eight Americans can now identify thermonuclear-scale bullshit as bullshit”

Pervy pastors and the nature of the profession

A (trigger warning!) Florida man was arrested and fired from his job after being caught taking pictures up a woman’s skirt at his pace of work. That place of work was a church, the woman was a parishioner, and the man arrested is a pastor.

Serious question: Why don’t church leaders seem more concerned about the frequency with which this stuff happens, which in turn relates to how easy it evidently is to achieve the designation of “pastor”?

I figure that folks at the top don’t see any way to stop what people leading any of the thousands of congregations across the country are doing, or they don’t really care.
Continue reading “Pervy pastors and the nature of the profession”

Steve McConkey goes full douchebag

As unlikely as it seems, Steve McConkey‘s antics are worse than ever. He posted this on his Facebook page this morning (I’ve included his followers’ comments as of 2:30 MDT to again establish the level of reckless ignorance and stupidity it takes to respond to anything this asshole says with anything besides derision and sad guffawing).

People like Steve are why the government needs to be more stringent about granting nonprofit status to “religious” “organizations” that are nothing more than ways for ersatz Christians like Steve, whose days are evidently consumed by unwanted fantasies about nude, well-oiled young men, to not only lobby for handouts from fellow morons, but avoid paying taxes on whatever handouts they receive.

Continue reading “Steve McConkey goes full douchebag”

Hellish desires

I sometimes think I’m too cynical. Then I remind myself that the majority of Americans claim to believe in an exquisitely well-concealed chamber of horrors where dead folks are tortured literally forever for thought crimes (such as believing in the “wrong” god) or actions that aren’t morally wrong at all. Virtually nothing could be more cynical than this.

The disturbing thing about the crazier strains of Christianity is that its adherents don’t merely think Hell is an actual place, one ecclesiastical consideration among many; they emphasize its inevitably cruel promises above all else. It seems that condemning others to Hell is a far more important consideration than striving to get into Heaven. Despite all the cool and useful things one might extract from holy books, a sizable fraction of the American religious population does little besides howl and complain about sinners and sin (and, in many cases, beg for money in the process).

Continue reading “Hellish desires”

The “atheists are actually angry believers” canard

[Note: I’ve duplicated all of my “Beck of the Pack” posts about Steve McConkey and Kim Duclos and included them here on the Chimp Refuge, with the dates of the original posts. Although both of these characters were once part of the running world, that’s no longer true, and I’m no longer interested in sullying a running blog with anything about either person. After all, this blog actually gets more traffic than my other one in spite of my having largely neglected it in recent years, and it also a more appropriate place to rant about the world’s reprobates, undesirables, and sick fucks. I also feel free to be even meaner here, which with an eye on recent events could come in quite handy. So, say hello to Steve and Kim. And if you want to keep tabs on the ridiculous things Steve writes and says in near-real time, try this humble group project.]

At this point, I won’t delete the relevant existing posts from BotP, and the more astute among you, and even some of you nitwits, can probably figure out why.]

Obviously, not everyone who believes or claims to believe in a supernatural Neitherbeing is insane, ignorant, lying, or stupid. Our brains are plainly wired in ways that make the idea of an unseen, megapowerful cosmos-creator universal across cultures.

But subscribing specifically to any one of the various religious fables on offer, and embracing absurdities as true, is a different story. Anyone who believes that the universe was created in six days within the past ten thousand years and that biological evolution is a hoax is either mentally disturbed or profoundly ignorant or both. One can adhere to a lazy sort of deism without clinging to the whole crazed, mostly purloined “Jesus-as-man-and-god nonsense. Bart Ehrman, a recovered born-again Christian and professor of religious studies, explores a lot of the rationale behind the explosion of Christianity in this podcast with Sam Harris.

When people who would be nutjobs no matter what take up the Christian cause, the results are predictably messy. Like this:

Continue reading “The “atheists are actually angry believers” canard”

This week in Steve McConkey: “Let me join the bigot club,” racism, and serious confusion

The normal response to being accused of racism, and for suffering the consequences of making racist remarks, is to at least acknowledge those remarks and either walk them back or double down on them, depending on the situation and the state of mind of the accused. Even admitted racists usually get at least this far.

The response of an addled whack-job like Steve McConkey in such a scenario is to blame others for the tumult and post similarly offensive remarks on publicly accessible Internet sites.

Last Tuesday, McConkey, a “ministry president” (i.e., unemployed professional beggar), boasted that he would be on a radio program the following afternoon. Prayers, as always, were appreciated.

Make no mistake — that site is run by “Christians” with views just as distasteful as McConkey’s; that they happen to be black is irrelevant. Except, that is, given that McConkey has made some jarringly insensitive statements about black people in the not-so-distant past.

Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: “Let me join the bigot club,” racism, and serious confusion”

The week in Steve McConkey: “What if they find out I’m an idiot?” edition

First, please see this page, linked from Steve’s 4 WINDS homepage and fated February 27, 2018. There, at least for now, you’ll find the following snippet:

Now have a look at this page, also linked from Steve’s main 4 WINDS page and dated March 19, 2018. It contains this:

Now then:

Continue reading “The week in Steve McConkey: “What if they find out I’m an idiot?” edition”

This week in Steve McConkey: Delusions of agency and the usual panopoly of jibber-jabber

April 30, 2:21 p.m. EDT update: 

Steve has posted a comment that reads: “[Beck] has been doing it six weeks. Finally had to stand to dispute the lies. Sometimes you have to stand. My counsel says yes as he makes things up. I will now move on.”

Steve, of course, has done no such thing. He has not disputed a word of what I have written on my blog. He has instead labeled me an atheist and a supporter of homosexuals, which I cheerfully admit to. He has also claimed that I am responsible for a number of Facebook accounts that are not in fact mine, but I don’t care about that. He says that I have written “lying articles against [him] at the blog” (he’s no Shakespeare) but has not pointed out a single lie. And he himself is lying because he said yesterday that he wasn’t going to address me anymore. I hope he’s looking forward to a toasty experience in Hell for his long, ugly streak of prevarications and other sins.

Yesterday, I forgot to mention a particularly vile and underhanded move Steve made — one typical of hucksters and scammers like this clown. Yesterday, he mentioned deaths and illnesses in his immediate family in an effort to gain sympathy that he can then use as leverage in his misguided attacks. Feeble-minded people are prone to blind spikes of outrage, like Chihuahuas, and Steve, though a dullard himself, knows this. He actually has the audacity to liken the passings of his wife’s parents in quick succession and his sister’s cancer diagnosis to “600 plus attacks by atheists and homosexuals,” as if the latter just sort of happened and are not a natural consequence of his monomania and yammering over the years. He puts these attacks in the category of “a real crises” (sic).


April 29, 8:15 p.m. EDT update especially for visitors from Steve McConkey’s Facebook page, before he deletes the post he made containing the link to this blog (screen shot):

* Steve says I’ve lied about him. Feel free to point any of those lies in the comment box below.

* Anyone who complains that I’m guilty of hate speech for maligning someone does nothing but howl about atheists, homosexuals, and others should see a neurologist. Steve can, of course, say these things all he likes — and I can say whatever I please about these things in return.


* Steve implores his Facebook readers to “keep judging.” I am merely taking him up on this. I have judged the weight of the evidence, and concluded that Steve is some combination of unintentional joke and profoundly disturbed and conflicted asshole.

* Steve says I “spent hours getting (the picture of him I use here) off the TV.” I spent about three seconds using my laptop to get a screen capture. Also, as a friend just put it, “I find it amusing that his primary concern is how he looks in one picture.” Maybe Steve should spend a few moments praying for the insight to appreciate why I write things about him in the first place. HINT: It’s not because of either demons or George Soros.


* Steve is attempting to repay the favor of my posting what he feels is an unflattering photo of him by posting more and more pictures of yours truly. I can save him some trouble by reminding him that the photos he’s using are photos I posted to the Internet myself. That should be a sign that I’m not especially embarrassed by them.

* Steve says I am a stalker for writing posts about him, which I started doing six weeks ago at the rate of one a week. Well, gol-lee, folks. Steve has been writing untoward “articles” about gays and transgender people almost daily for a long time now. He has operated a “ministry” for almost 40 years to attack gay people who have nothing to do with him and have never even heard of him, and just want to live their lives. Steve pretends that this is “God’s work.” Well, if he can say that, so can I. My god is obviously smarter and cooler than his, because I can write in complete sentences and don’t look like someone who was just extruded from the bunghole of a diseased yak.

I realize that this exhortation will not resonate with you folks for multiple reasons, but I’ll say it anyway: Do the fucking math. 

* I bet none of you have even gotten this far, but just as a check: Because Steve’s posts are public, so are the comments you all leave on his page. As a result, I can see your real names. Obviously, at least a few of you — as hard as it is for me to believe — have jobs, and you probably want to keep them. If you find yourself expressing opinions that strike me as uncivil, I may take it upon myself to convey these opinions to folks in your immediate sphere of operations who can influence your employment status. 

* Steve has repeatedly complained that I have alluded to his eventual death, as if this constitutes a crime of some sort. Do any of you remember him celebrating Stephen Hawking’s actual death? Or that of James Cone last week? No? Better keep reading.

* This comment, in which Steve declares that he will stop mentioning me, is assuredly another of his lies. Actually, two of them. Either that or Steve really needs better counsel.

Suppose I stepped back from my obvious contempt for Steve McConkey — a pathetic basket case, a coward (the post on which Hemant focuses is gone) and the apotheosis of every awful thing about Christianity — and merely approached his body of work as an academic might. Even if I were to explore his demented output with utmost clinical detachment, I’d still find it easy to write lengthy posts each week about multiple facets of his corrupt thought processes and behavior. Part of this is because I’m still learning things about that reveal that there is basically no bottom to how much of a scourge he is, but for the most part it’s because he continually generates new madness. He’s like a version of Aladdin’s lamp in the form a wrinkly ass pointed upward and outward. He waits, bent over at the waist and grasping his ankles, and when someone wanders by and rubs those nasty old cheeks, a geyser of semi-solid rhetorical shit spews out: some delusions this time, some whining the next time, false appeals to scripture the next. This metaphor, in addition to being a tad nauseating, breaks down at the level of the number of wishes Aladdin’s genie was willing to grant. Steve’s ass-genie doesn’t stop at three or thirty or even three hundred; it’s a bottomless well of foulness that will keep erupting for as long as its keeper continues toiling away sadly in his Wisconsin home, subsidized by donations from the dolt brigade and most likely his progeny.

Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: Delusions of agency and the usual panopoly of jibber-jabber”

This week in Steve McConkey: A snowflake who courageously deletes everything

Ir’s time to explicitly observe a number of things about Steve McConkey that I should have understood from the moment I was first directed toward one of his Facebook posts. In short:

1) He’s not the most astute philosopher or scholar out there. This has been clear from the beginning and is a requirement for maintaining the views he does.
2) He’s a fundamentally indecent person — slothful, malicious and dishonest and determined to extract enough cash from fellow dimwits and crazies to offset his inability or refusal to hold a job. This, like low cognitive wattage, is de rigueur for Christians of his ilk.
3) He has overt mental problems that interfere with his everyday functioning, but are not sufficiently severe to absolve him of accountability for his behavior. This aspect of his persona drives most of what I focus on below.
4) He no more a Christian at heart than I am, and is probably less so. This is true of most people who make public proclamations about their religious belefs, which are almost invariably a ploy for self-enrichment. Steve McConkey’s “faith” is not more than a shield for his fundamental distaste for gays and transgender people and a mechanism for begging.
5) He’s going to retain all of these traits for the rest of his life, because God dealt him an unfavorable hand, and because people who behave like he does for as long as he has virtually never shift toward more accommodating points of view.

Having followed Steve for all of five weeks now, I’ve gained a sense of why he hasn’t garnered more negative attention over the years. Sure, he’s plainly a goof and easy enough for reasonable people and everyday Christians to ignore, but he’s been trying to make a name for himself in a relatively limited sports niche for at least 37 years. On this basis alone, it seems that his controversial blather would have been called into question more energetically than it has.

As it happens, a big part of the explanation is fairly simple. At any given time, Steve’s online presence is a remarkable not for what’s posted under his name — on his personal and “Steve report” Facebook pages as well as his “4 Winds” site — but for what was once posted in these places but is now missing.

Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: A snowflake who courageously deletes everything”

This week in Steve McConkey: Crank-calling the FBI, and getting some real attention

First, Steve McConkey will be happy to know that his “worldwide press releases” are being picked up and mentioned by at least one high-traffic blogger outside the Evangelical clown-bubble. Hemant Mehta of The Friendly Atheist, who made a note of Mr. McConkey’s antics in 2015, has addressed Steve’s grousing about transgender runners being allowed to run the Boston Marathon. The only thing Hemant gets somewhat wrong is calling Steve the leader of anything. Steve is the president of 4 WINDS in the same way I am the chief executive of this blog, except that I am 1) not illiterate, 2) not asking anyone for money, and 3) not a lunatic, although I certainly seem to be involved with crazies to a suspicious extent.

Second, Steve is none too pleased about my blog posts mentioning him, though of course he’s too much of a coward to link to them for the benefit of the jabbering imbeciles who follow him:
Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: Crank-calling the FBI, and getting some real attention”

This week in Steve McConkey: “The end is imminent, so fund my eventual trips to Iowa”

The raging anti-gay Evangelical garbage-stream called Steve McConkey continually erupts with dire, self-contradictory posts that would make no sense at all but for one unlikely but undeniable fact: The people in his target audience are even dumber and more deluded than he is, and Steve wants not only their approval but their money. That PayPal donation button is by far the most important thing on his website, because without a “ministry” or his family to support him, Steve McConkey would have to actually have to support himself through something resembling honest labor.

First, let me emphasize my immovable and eminently justifiable position that any self-described Christian who supports Donald Trump has, incontrovertibly and by definition, given away the game and can be derided as a joke and charlatan with restraint limited only by the mercy of the critic (and these days I possess little). This is not because I can’t stand Trump myself, although that’s true and has been ever since his vaginiform grimace first washed up on television in the 1980s. It’s because I understand that supporting Trump as a Christian is a logically untenable position, case closed, full stop, et cetera. It’s akin to agitating for women’s rights while simultaneously arguing that rape should be reclassified from a felony to a low-level misdemeanor, or going on television and gravely telling America’s young athletes to stay off steroids while wearing a T-shirt that says BODY BY DECA-DURABOLIN. It would be precisely that bad were it not in fact far worse.

Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: “The end is imminent, so fund my eventual trips to Iowa””

This week in Steve McConkey: lies, futility and inanity

Steve McConkey, who claims to have operated a ministry for Christian track athletes (read: “I’ll try to help you not be gay anymore”) since 1981 but doesn’t have a single endorsement on his websitecontinues to complain about mindfulness meditation. He is concerned that this secular practice, the efficacy of which has a modicum of empirical support, is is replacing Christian prayer in the professional and sports world. He also cautions against engaging in yoga, which is evil for reasons Steve chooses to not disclose. He proposes in yet another “worldwide press release” (i.e., an Internet posting) that non-Christian prayers carry “the potential of opening up the user to the darkness.”

This development, from the standpoint of a babbling idiot, is indeed a gross injustice. As anyone with only slightly less insight than a gnat is aware, just as no one can be both a weightlifter and a runner, it’s absolutely impossible to be a Christian and engage in any sort of contemplative reflection besides prayer (“prayer” in this context meaning “beseeching the God of the Holy Bible to enact certain Old Testament precepts while complete ignoring the foundational tenets of Jesus’ message”).
Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: lies, futility and inanity”

This week in Steve McConkey: Meditation is “dangerous” and a “false religion”

My new friend Steve McConkey has been busy this week at his job, which is getting angry at the various ways in which the United States is not a Christian theocracy.

As is Steve’s tireless habit — I discovered that he even has his own tag on “Right Wing Watch” — he’s using distortions of reality to maximize his level of personal unrest. For example, yesterday, he titled one of his complaints “Trump, GOP Congress Give Planned Parenthood $500 Million In Taxpayer Funds,” as if this is something new (it’s not). But since this nominally a running blog, and Steve McConkey has historically focused his energetic stupidity on track and field athletes, I’ll focus on his major track-related gripe of the week: Nike’s new “Headspace” app. (In a version of this complaint he posted two days ago, he mentioned 2016 U.S. Olympian Colleen Quigley’s endorsement of the technique, but later scrapped it. He does quite a bit of this sort of rant-tweaking and screed-juggling.)

The potential utility of mindfulness meditation is sports is well established, though in need of further study. (I’ll admit that the name “Headspace” reminds of this.) But I won’t spend time here analyzing this because it’s not central to the point, which is that Steve McConkey is lying about what this technique is, how people are using it, and the possible effects of trying it.

He starts with the usual breathless hyperbole:
Continue reading “This week in Steve McConkey: Meditation is “dangerous” and a “false religion””

Living on handouts to combat gay athletes is tough work, but someone’s gotta do it

[Ed.  note: this post is being updated regularly to reflect new discoveries revealing just how messed up Steve McConkey is.]

I admit that I questioned whether this exposition belongs on a running blog, or anywhere. It will, after all, do no more than briefly focus attention on a person with dubious aims and substandard cognitive abilities for the benefit of a handful snickering people, and will likely result in zero net effects on the human circus as a whole. But since that sums up virtually everything I post, including things I write about myself, why quit now?

The other night, one of my many provocateur-friends called attention to a public Facebook post on the page of one Steve McConkey, who has vague connections to the track world (and whose name I immediately read as “McMonkey” thanks to this glorious parable about racism and hucksterism, a true gem in the invaluable Dr. Seuss canon).

By the time I saw this, it had elicited a predictable groundswell of full-throated dunce-yawps couched as pitying sentiments for Hawking, whom the ersatz-faithful were positively certain was now being tormented for all eternity in Hell by their boundlessly compassionate ecclesiastical fetish-figure. This kind of Hawking-bashing fun sprung up all over the Web; I’m betting that at the news of Hawking’s overdue demise, a few old-coot fundies somewhere in the Incest Belt experienced the faint stirrings of an erection for the first time since Sarah Palin was on a national ticket.

Continue reading “Living on handouts to combat gay athletes is tough work, but someone’s gotta do it”

Evangelicals increasingly suffering from an unfair burden: reality

A recent Christian Post article exploring the results of another survey showing a decline in the popularity of Christianity in the U.S. is, as is true of most Evangelical expulsions, entertaining for its lack of insight into how people view them.

By definition, Evangelicals are living a life built on lies and denial. It is one thing to believe in a conscious creator of the universe and leave it at that (I don’t, but it’s not a strictly irrational idea) but quite another to reject evolution and other basic scientific realities. So in a sense, it shouldn’t be surprising when Evangelicals turn out to be moral hypocrites as well as purveyors of — to be kind — psuedo-scientific nonsense.

But one would think that they would at least be able to understand why other people are not okay with their whole scam. That is, they should appreciate that there are valid reasons that other people aren’t on board with their peculiar shambles of an alternative reality.  Continue reading “Evangelicals increasingly suffering from an unfair burden: reality”